The Yorkshire Poem

We're Way Down In't Coyle 'Oyle



We're down in't coyle 'oyle
Where't muck slarts on't winders
We've used all us coyle up
And we're rait down't t'cinders,
But if bum bailiff comes
Ee'll nivver findus
Cos we'll be down in't coyle 'oyle
Where't muck slarts on't winders

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The following translation was provided on the Internet in 2005 by the North Yorkshire BBC:

We're down in the cellar
Where the dirt has collected on the windows
We have used up all our coal
And we are now down to the cinders
If the rent man comes
He will never find us
For we will be down in the cellar
Where the dirt has collected on the windows

The basement (cellar) was used in many old houses for the storage of coal for the fire. A floor-level, wooden hatch provided entry for the Coalman to deposit the hundredweight (112 lb, i.e. 50 kg) bags of coal that they carried on their shoulder from the horse-drawn cart (Later trucks). In was through excavating this access that John and his friend Lawrie Jeffs were able to extricate their boats after building them in the basement (Cellar) of John's house in Skircoat Green, Halifax. Other houses had an outhouse with a high, wooden, access door (Like a window) and direct access from the laneway.

Created: 23rd January 2005
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